October 7, 2011

Mirror, mirror on the …whoa, what a NOSE! It’s fairytale villains and noblemen with tragic protuberances, and a hilarious letter this week…

From Dodgson Sr. to Dodgson Jr. (Lewis Carroll)
Read by Simon Vance

Simon writes…

A letter written in 1840 to the then 8 yr old Charles Dodgson by his father.

Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs, by The Brothers Grimm

Read by Xe Sands

Xe writes…

I am holding in my hands, and reading from, the beautiful and dark storybook I received from my grandparents as a very young child. I became fascinated with the unique and powerful illustrations by Nancy Eckholm Burkert. And this version, unlike the sugar-coated versions I had read previously, featured the original ending: the wicked stepmother/Queen is forced to dance in red-hot iron shoes until she is dead. The illustration for this scene is simply a darkened street with empty iron boots, juxtaposed with the wedding scene on the opposite page.

The story stayed largely in the back of my mind, buried deeply, even occasionally repudiated by my feminist, conscious mind as outdated and even misogynistic. Until…until I was fortunate enough to have several conversations with Harald Azmann, author of The True Snow White. Harald reminded me of the power of fairytales, the archetypal journey, and the mirror the Queen finds in Snow White, and vice versa.

Thank you, Harald, for bringing the beauty and meaning of this story back to the forefront of my mind, where it belongs.

Death Scene from Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond Rostand                                                                                                                      

Read by Diane Havens and Robert Jadah

Diane writes…

From Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond Rostand, a play written in 1897, translated from the French. Here the final death scene, Robert Jadah plays Cyrano and Diane Havens, Roxane. It is not until he is wounded and dying that she has discovers it was he that she has loved all along.

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