August 3, 2012

Let’s start out with some humor this week, pass through the Classics, and end with a bit of heartbreak, courtesy of Byron, shall we? We shall…

.

Dislikes, by Oliver Wendell Holmes
Read by Karen Commins


Karen writes…

In Facebook, the “Like” button is ever-present. You can Like a picture, a status update, a video…. anything posted by anyone else. But what about the Dislikes? We all have them. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a button for them?

Why wait for a button when you can listen to this short, humorous essay from Oliver Wendell Holmes. He wrote about the various kinds of people he dislikes, and perhaps you will find yourself in agreement with his views!

.

Ode on a Grecian Urn, by John Keats
Read by Diane Havens


Diane writes…

John Keats was my first poet-love in high school. I can remember discussing this poem in particular, and vividly recall the spirited conversation we has about the meaning of “beauty is truth and truth beauty.” It was all so open ended as the best in poems are.

And many years later, on a visit to Rome, walking the Spanish Steps to the Keats-Shelley house, I became that young girl again, and understood those words so well.

.

Tom Jones – Book 1, Chapter 2, by Henry Fielding
Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark  writes…

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

.

We’ll Go No More A-Roving, by Lord Byron (George Gordon)
Read by Xe Sands

Xe  writes…

OK, don’t anyone pass out or anything…but, well, there might just be a wee bit of, erm, rhyming.

Yes, yes, I know. I don’t like rhyming in poetry, generally. I often spend bits of words in these write-ups bemoaning the use of rhyme in poetry (while also acknowledging that I am largely alone in this rhyme phobia). And yes, this one caught me.

Oh who knows why…maybe because it’s Byron? Well that can’t be it because I am generally irritated by his poetry. Let’s just pretend it’s because of Byron and that I swooned under his poetic prowess and say no more about it, shall we? Alright then.

.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Going Public

Post navigation

Comments are closed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: