Going Public…in Shorts – 6/28

Another double feature today! Kyle Munley offers An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, by Ambrose Bierce, and visits with Emily at Emily’s Reading Room (link live later this morning), and Xe Sands has a nifty audio chat & listener Q&A with Kelli at The Oddiophile, and offers The Yellow Wallpaper, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Be sure to check them both out!


Listening & Downloading 
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is offered in full for online listening through July 4th. You can also purchase a download of this story via Downpour, with proceeds going to Reach Out and Read.

 

 

kylemunley_1355774329_52An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, by W.W. Jacobs

Set during the American Civil War, “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is the story of Peyton Farquhar, a Confederate sympathizer condemned to death by hanging from Owl Creek Bridge. The last thoughts and desperate struggles of a man condemned to die by hanging make for white-knuckle suspense in this classic short story.

 

Kyle Munley is an audiobook narrator and voiceover artist currently recording and residing in the foothills of the Blue Ridge mountains in Greenville, SC.

   

 

 
Listening & Downloading
The Yellow Wallpaper + Why I wrote The Yellow Wallpaper is offered in full for online listening through July 4th. You can also purchase a download of this story via Downpour, with proceeds going to Reach Out and Read.
 

 

xesands

The Yellow Wallpaper, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper is a 6,000-word short story by the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature, illustrating attitudes in the 19th century toward women’s physical and mental health. Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman whose physician husband has confined her to the upstairs bedroom of a house he has rented for the summer. She is forbidden from working and has to hide her journal from him, so she can recuperate from what he calls a “temporary nervous depression – a slight hysterical tendency,” a diagnosis common to women in that period. The windows of the room are barred, and there is a gate across the top of the stairs, allowing her husband to control her access to the rest of the house. The story depicts the effect of confinement on the narrator’s mental health and her descent into psychosis. With nothing to stimulate her, she becomes obsessed by the pattern and color of the wallpaper. “It is the strangest yellow, that wall-paper! It makes me think of all the yellow things I ever saw – not beautiful ones like buttercups, but old foul, bad yellow things. But there is something else about that paper – the smell! … The only thing I can think of that it is like is the color of the paper! A yellow smell.”

Xe Sands is a three-time AudioFile Earphones Award winner known for her authentic characterizations and intimate delivery. She  has more than a decade of experience bringing stories to life through narration, performance, and visual art, including recordings of Magnificence by Lydia Millet, The Art Forger, by B.A. Shapiro, and Is This Tomorrow, by Caroline Leavitt. Sands has also been recognized for her engaging romance narrations, and was named Most Impressive Narrator Discovery for titles such as Catch of the Day, by Kristan Higgins, and On Thin Ice, by Anne Stuart.

 
 
 
Today’s Blog Hosts:
 
 
 
emily buttonEmily’s Reading Room
Emily’s Reading Room began in 2009 as a way to get book recommendations to family and friends. Since then it has become a place to recommend books to anyone who loves reading (particularly YA fiction). Emily is particularly fond of recommending great audiobooks for long (and short!) trips.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Born out of a (dare we say?) obsession with audiobooks, The Oddiophile is the alter ego of Kelli Nichols. After wearing out the ear (and patience) of friends and family with her endless chatter about audiobooks, The Oddiophile took to the Internet in August of 2011 to find other like-minded fanatic… erm, audiobook fans. As a free-range listener, reviews for anything from Young Adult to Romance to Speculative Fiction to Mystery and Suspense (and all their glorious sub-genres) are the norm on the site. Stop by and let’s talk audiobooks.

 
 
 
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