2.22.15

Doesn’t “2.22” have such a lovely ring to it? SO much more beautiful sounding than plain ol’ “2.20.”

So, for this 2.22, we’ve got a lovely line-up for you. Diane Havens rejoins us, Wayne Gatfield is in the house, as is Sara Morsey, relative GP ProjectLono comes in with a musical/poetry mash-up, Bright Horizons serial finally resumes, and of course, Tom Jones rounds us out.

Enjoy!

 

Bright Horizons – Part 2, by Maevyn Davis-Rackerby

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

…recorded with permission of the author

Start with Part 1: 

Long delay between Part 1 and Part 2…but re-embarking on a journey over the next 9 weeks…a dark one, as we join our unreliable narrator, Jax as they try to make sense of what’s happening to them, both inside and out, just what kind of place they’ve found themselves in, and what the hell is wrong with Bright Horizons.

Written by Maevyn Davis-Rackerby for the NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program in 2011, it’s my privilege to be allowed to try and do it justice. Still stuns me that my kid whipped this out in junior high.

Image credit: megan ann
hallway of dreams. nightmares
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

 

 

 

Flutes, by Diane Havens

Read by Diane Havens

We had a good friend who’d gifted us with these beautiful handcrafted champagne flutes, now over 30 years ago. They are irreplaceable, much like the memories attached to them.

I Was the Slightest in the House, by Emily Dickinson

 

 

Golden Key, by Wayne Gatfield

Read by Wayne Gatfield

If player does not display, click here.

Wayne writes…
Poems of mine with music

Amanita Muscaria, by ProjectLono

If player does not display, click here.

A poem written and performed by Bob Beagrie, with music and recording arrangement by SJForth.

Tom Jones, Book XII, Chapter 7, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 12 Chapter 7 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, we learn the political leanings of the people at the inn. It turns out they’re all Jacobites! Since this book takes place during a failed Jacobite rebellion, that should be concerning to all those present who might be loyal to the Hanoverian dynasty. It should be noted that at this point in history, the Pretender, James Francis Edward, had taken on a quasi-mythical significance to his followers, and would someday return to set everything right. There is, of course, also much concern among the people at the inn that he would impose his Catholicism on the nation if he ever took control.

At a certain point late in the chapter, they all toast to his health, which apparently you do by toasting the king while your mug is over some vessel containing water, and that way it would be understood that you’re toasting the king “over the water” (ie, in exile in France).

Categories: Uncategorized

2.13.15

Don’t anyone pass out or anything…but it’s actually still Friday afternoon!

 

*gasp*

 

I know, right? What can I say? The planets aligned or something…

 

 

Currents by kayemnic

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

…recorded with permission of the author

This poem. I’ve tried countless times to record it, but it was all garbage. Well, until this week maybe. There is something so reaching, something that just pulls me into it, right down to that tide’s edge, with the speaker, the longing witness in the poem. I can see her – the dog sitting by her side, the book clutched in her hand like a talisman, like a way to say, “See – I am still holding you….and I will stay in this place, and write nothing in this book without you.”

 

 

 

The Garden of Love, by William Blake

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XII, Chapter 5, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 12 Chapter 5 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, Tom and Partridge come upon a puppet show, performing a play called The Provoked Husband. The play is dry of any comedy or entertainment value, which most of the audience considers to be a plus, but Tom would rather a Punch and Joan show.

This is an important chapter in its historical context. Henry Fielding had been a playwright earlier in his career, but left the stage when new regulations regarding the content of plays were enacted. The play presented in this chapter, The Provoked Husband, is a play fragment by John Vanbrugh titled A Journey to London, which was completed and renamed after Vanbrugh’s death by Colly Cibber. Cibber changed the ending against Vanbrugh’s wishes, adding in a happy ending. As well, Vanbrugh’s works were also prevented from being performed in anything but bowdlerised versions.

So, the puppet show that Jones and Partridge witness is a comedy with everything funny stripped out, replaced with Lessons to Instruct the Young.

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XII, Chapter 6, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 12 Chapter 6 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, one of the puppeteers is caught with the chambermaid of the inn where the puppet show took place in the previous chapter. We get some more shouting at a chambermaid by an innkeeper, and once again, Tom Jones is convinced to stay at yet another inn.

Categories: Uncategorized

2.6.15

Entering into the season of love and Hallmark…but not yet!

 

My Grandmother’s Love Letters, by Hart Crane

Read by Xe Sands

 

 

Hafiz All the Hemispheres, by Sara Mosey

 

 

Nothing Lasts Forever, by Suzy Hazelwood

 

 

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

1.30.15

Cannot believe we’re almost through January!

 

 

Love’s Secret, by William Blake

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

Every once in an a while, you just need a little Blake to shake things up.

 

 

 

Poetry  Moving On, by Phillip Laurence Carter

 

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XII, Chapter 4, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 12 Chapter 4 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, Tom is, at long last, reunited with Sophia…’s pocketbook. It turns out, a disabled beggar found it after she dropped it, and coincidentally, he tries to sell it to Tom. Tom then not only finds Sophia’s name written on it, but also the 100 pound bank note that her father had given to her that she had lost a few chapters back.

Categories: Uncategorized

1.24.15

Ah well. Best laid plans and all that. Sometimes life and work just gets in the way.

 

So this week, Wayne Gatfield rejoin us with a beautiful new piece, YOU, and we’ve also got a bit of revisiting with Walt Whitman, and of course, Tom Jones to round us out.

 

 

You, by Wayne Gatfield

Read by Wayne Gatfield

If player does not display, click here.

 

Wayne writes…
Three poems of mine with music

 

 

When I Heard at the Close of the Day, by Walt Whitman

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

Was looking for a piece to reshare this week, and although I usually reshare those that are a bit older, this one is so timely and serves as a such a personal reminder to keep sight of and cherish what’s truly important, what actually feeds the soul, that I knew it was the one to share this week.

 

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XII, Chapter 3, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 12 Chapter 3 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

We finally rejoin Tom and Partridge in this chapter. Tom is now feeling especially downtrodden that he’s been caught in the act by Sophia and that she’s forsaken him. After some weeping and gnashing of teeth, Tom decides that he and Partridge are going to give their lives for king and country.

Partridge, however, wants nothing more than to return Tom to Allworthy, whom he imagines misses Tom, not realizing that Tom’s been banished. Add to that he’s more keen on living to see 80 or 90 years old, rather than dying in a battle. Tom tries to convince him of the glories of dying for one’s country by quoting a poem by Horace.

It is, ironically, the same poem that was quoted hundreds of years later by Wilfred Owen, a soldier and poet in World War I to describe the horrors of a chlorine gas attack.

Categories: Uncategorized

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