8.28.15

 

 

 

Amaze, by Adelaide Crapsey (re-release)

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

 

Been thinking about aging quite a bit, lately…how it will affect me personally, how it has affected the women in my life. And thinking especially about how we perceive and treat elderly folks we meet, often as if they are somehow a different person than they were when they looked more like our often younger selves. There is a bit of dread, I must confess, a bit of dread as I think on being 70, 80…and not being seen for who I actually am. So here’s a re-release of a poem I did some months back.

 

 

Duel, Vernon Crumrine

Read by Sara Mosey

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Sara writes…

This poem by Vernon Crumrine softly addresses what may be a much more powerful idea than what we as mortals can imagine. With permission.

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 6, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 6 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, Partridge informs Tom in the crudest possible way that Nancy, the older daughter of Mrs. Miller, is pregnant by My. Nightingale. Tom learns from Mrs. Miller that Nightingale has left Nancy, and written her a letter informing her that he’ll never see he again, but provide for her and the baby. Of course, nothing ever goes as planned, so Nancy faints upon reading the letter, and the letter was read by everyone else who was nearby, and so now she’s the talk of the town.

Everyone in the family is doing poorly, as Nancy has attempted suicide, and Betsy, the younger daughter is certain that if Nancy succeeds in killing herself, both Mrs. Miller and she will follow soon after. Tom pledges to find Nightingale and make him do the right thing.

 

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 7, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 7 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, Tom manages to convince Mr. Nightingale to marry Nancy, on the condition that he, Tom, will explain what’s happened to Nightingale’s father.

Categories: Uncategorized

8.14.15

Oh my. It’s been far too long! Just been extraordinarily busy with work, and while I adore my job and am grateful every single day that I get paid do this wonderful thing (reading books aloud for money? What could possibly top that? Did I mention that I can work in my jammies?), it does mean that when the workload demands long days and longer weeks, many other things have to take a backseat.

 

So! Let’s see what we’ve got to share this week, shall we?

 

Number 3 on the Docket, by Amy Lowell

Read by Xe Sands

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Xe writes…

 

Amy Lowell just has this way of storytelling, whether with poems such as this one, which, like Frost’s Home Burial, is designed as a story, rather than a poem, or any of her more traditional poetry. She can be  extremely concise, or descriptive, but either way, there is always a resonance. This piece, from Lowell’s Men, Women and Ghosts collection, gets at themes of isolation, loss of control, and how that can have drastic and unintended consequences. 

 

 

Ode to Existing, by Daniel Summerhill

Read by O+ Poetess & Femcee

If player does not display, click here.

O+ Poetess & Femcee write…

a nod to a dear friend and inspirational poet Daniel Summerhill author of Brown Boys on Stoops over Soldier- Erykah Badu Instrumental. “This poem is not to play the pity game….My tongue is metaphor for celebration. An ode to existing”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remnant, by ProjectLono

Performed by ProjectLono

 

 

The Mountaintop @MartinLutherKing

Performed by DanleMiel

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

DanleMiel writes…

Martin Luther King’s last speech! Accompanied with an excellent video clip.

 

 

Rose of the World, adapted from George MacDonald

Read by theshadowlands

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theshadowlands writes…

Artwork by Christi L. Williams “God, Not Gift ” ( 11 x 14 oil on canvass )
Connect with her: www.christiwilliamsart.com/ (Visions of Hope & Fear)
Facebook: www.facebook.com/christi.l.williams

My poetic rendering of George MacDonald’s short story “The Wise Woman”
(Poem 4)

—Rose Of the World—

This other country, was also strange
Every sheperd and sheperdess within range
Every dairymaid and laborer seen
Were no wiser than the king and queen

So odd, how people from either land
Of higher position and lower stand
All thinking Somebody important they be
All blind to other worthy souls to see

The sheperd girl also was also to grow
Thinking she Somebody was all there was to know
So strange that everything of pleasure to soul or eye
Nothing in this country could satisfy

So odd, no contentment there to be
Only striving with misery
Of things they would never possess
Vain pursuits with all the stress

Meanwhile, in the land of royal fame
Princess Rosamond, would be her name
She like a single, royal flag unfurled
Her name to mean-Rose of the World

Her little heart so ever wanting
Her strivings ever daunting
Beyond measure, what she would desire
More than the kingdom entire

Her parents many her desires to meet
Still left feeling incomplete
To lavish her heart and vainly festoon
I dare say, she even desired to have the moon…(-bc)

 

 

The Tell-Tale Heart, by Edgar Allan Poe

Read by Nate Daniels

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Nate writes…

The Tell-Tale Heart is a classic horror tale from the macabre mind of Edgar Allen Poe.

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 4, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 4 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

Well, here is the final chapter of year three of my four year project! Normally, I’d like to post stats about precisely how much audio I’ve posted for the chapter, but unfortunately, SoundCloud doesn’t show you how long your playlists are anymore, which makes me sad. And since the raw audio is split up among a ton of different directories on a few backup drives, it’s tough to compute it on my own.

Anyway, in this chapter, Nightingale tells Tom that he’s afraid Nancy, Mrs. Miller’s daughter, might be in love with him, and so he’s leaving the boarding house that very day. On top of that, Nightingale’s father has arrived with the woman he’s to marry, so he needs to focus on that now.

Did I mention in previous chapter recaps that Stanley Kubrick used a character named Nightingale to get a character into a private masquerade in his film Eyes Wide Shut? So there’s a definite Tom Jones influence there.

 

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 5, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 5 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, we learn the history of Mrs. Miller. It turns out she’s had a terrible life, but Squire Allworthy took pity on her in her darkest hour and gave her the house in London where she and her daughters currently live. Therefore, she’s quiet willing to put up with most of what Tom gets up to, since she knows of his connection to the Squire.

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

7.31.15

 

 

The Messages (Redux), by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

Yep. Just posted this one, what, a month ago? So why the redo…
Because when I listened back to the first recording, I really didn’t like it. Oh sure, there was emotion there and all that. But the way I performed it…it, well, it robbed the listener of the experience somehow – fed it to them, instead of allowing them to come to their own emotional choice.

And as that’s something I think about often as a performer, and as GP gives me the freedom to do whatever the heck I want (the beauty of being the boss), I decided to redo it, and throw it open to y’all – the listeners. If you’re so inclined, list to both and let me know which is a more effective, more evocative experience for you (er, provided either one is, of course). I’m dying to know…

 

 

 

Something Beautiful, by Wayne Gatfield

Read by Wayne Gatfield

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Wayne writes…

An inspirational poem of mine with added music(not mine)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Black Wedding Dress, Vernon Crumrine

Read by Sara Mosey

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Sara writes…

a short poem by my colleague Vernon Crumrine with permission

 

 

The Howling and the Weeping, George MacDonald

Read by theshadowlands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

theshadowlands writes…

My poetic rendering of George MacDonald’s short story “The Gray Wolf” (Poem 6)

—The Howling and the Weeping—

Suddenly he woke with his shoulder in pangs
By a creature with its embedded fangs
Pulsating was he now in throbbing pain
His strength and mind he could not regain

The young man with one hand to resist
With other hand and knife to assist
Flailing he struggled in vain
Futile stabbing again and again

The creature snuffed and snorted
With its wild body contorted
The fought and rolled around
Across the cottage and to the ground

As the creature leapt and rolled
From his neck now loosening it hold
Soon releasing a howl and a scream
The mixture so strange and so extreme

The creature darted out the door
Sea and spray spread across the floor
With the spray and mist upon his face
He sprang to his feet and began the chase

It was dark, and a wild and stormy night
With crashing waves of flashing white
During this raining, stormy scare
A gruesome sound then filled the air

From the dark, there came a growl
Then a rising mixture of weep and howl
He turned back where he was before
To enter the cottage and to close the door

The lamp’s flicker was soon to quench
Not certain of a woman who might be upon the bench
The student overcome with sudden fear
Then seeing that there was no one here

The aftershock would not abate
So for daylight, the student sat to wait
The morning was dim, gusty and gray
And out the door, did he make his way

He wandered the beach in the morning light
Considering all that had happened that dreadful night
Along the beach, still ringing in his ear
The howling…and the weeping…that night…to hear..(-bc)

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 2, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 2 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, we see more of Henry Fielding as a playwright. He sets up a classic farcical situation, where Lady Bellaston has come to Tom’s room to seduce him, but while she’s there, Sophia servant, Mrs. Honour, arrives. Lady Bellaston then must hide behind a bed curtain and hears everything Mrs. Honour says to Tom, which is, of course, purely insults upon Lady Bellaston’s honor.

 

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 3, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 3 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

In this chapter, Tom received a visit from Mrs. Miller, who tells him that she wants him out of her house, that having multiple women visit him at all hours of the night will ruin the reputations of her daughters, and that even though he’s a relation of Squire Allworthy, she can’t abide his behaviour. Tom immediately suspects that Patridge has let slip that Tom was Allworthy’s ward.

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

7.17.15

 

 

The Great Hunt, by Carl Sandburg

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

Don’t we all have someone to whom we owe something – an explanation, a declaration…even if they are oblivious to it? And will we tell them, before it becomes moot not to?

No. Most likely, we won’t.

Image credit: Varun Suresh
License: CC BY 2.0

 

 

 

Emma, by Wayne Gatfield

Read by Wayne Gatfield

If player does not display, click here.

Wayne writes…

A poem of mine with music (not mine)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ani Poem. Goddess Thoughts. New Moon in Cancer, Amani O+Poetess

Read by Susan Marie

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Amani O+Poetess writes…

Why Ani Poems?

Ani (also known as Ala, Ana, Ale, and Ali in varying Igbo dialects) is the Earth Mother Goddess; female Alusi (deity) of the earth, morality, death, and fertility in Odinani.
The Igbo people of Nigeria call Her the mother of all things, but She is both the fertile earth and the empty field after the harvest. She is present at the beginning of the cycle of life, making children grow in their mother’s womb, and She is there at the end of the cycle, to receive the souls of the dead into Her own womb.
Her name literally translates to ‘Ground’ in the Igbo language, denoting Her powers over the earth and Her status as the ground itself.
Ala is considered the highest Alusi in the Igbo pantheon and was the first Alusi, daughter of Chukwu, the supreme god. Ala’s husband is Amadioha, the sky god.
We each are the beginning, middle and end. We are light and dark. Womyn in particular . In this ircle, among other things, Ani Poems represents the cycle of creation, critique and sharing.
Ani Poems, Goddess Thoughts aims to foster a space for Women of Color in Upstate NY that celebrates the beauty of each moment and at every stage of life while recognizing the value of what we each bring to the table. We are the green garden, we are the empty garden, we are everything in between and we are all beautiful.
Photo Cred: juachiobi.deviantart.com/…/Ala-Earth-…ess-3361791…
More Here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ala_%28Odinani%29

 

 

Gleaming Eyes and Shining Teeth, George MacDonald

Read by theshadowlands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

theshadowlands writes…

My poetic rendering of George MacDonald’s “The Gray Wolf”

—Gleaming Eyes & Shining Teeth—

The old woman pointed to a heather bed
As the place for the night to lay his head
Weary, the young man, from this day
Wrapped himself in his cloak to hit the hay

The moment his head to lay
A fresh storm was underway
The wind blew through the cracks of the hut
His cloak over his head, for the noise to rebut

Unable to sleep, he listened away
As the window held back the sea and spray
The door opened, the young woman came in
Curled up on the bench with her hand on her chin

In that same strange posture as before
Her face turned towards the young man all the more
If he moved, she would drop her head
Yet still she quietly, keenly peering towards his bed

The mother soon to disappear
Drowsiness and soon sleep was drawing near
A move from the bench, the boy to excite
Thinking a four-footed creature, was drowsily in sight

Hazily dreaming a large dog to trot across the floor
Then with stealth to quietly exit the door
In the darkness, he felt a rising dread
The fixed gaze of two eyes upon his bed

He stared at the fire, then was soon aware
The bench was vacant, and the young woman, not there
Wondering, what reason to enter a storm so deep
Soon reposing, the young man fell fast asleep

In the depth of that stormy night
Awakened in pain at what was in his sight
A deep ache in his shoulder to be
With gleaming eyes and shining teeth…to now…see…(-bc)

 

 

Tom Jones, Book XIV, Chapter 1, by Henry Fielding

Read by Mark Turetsky

[

Mark writes…

Book 14 Chapter 1 of Tom Jones.

This is part of an ongoing project in which I will record and post one chapter per week of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones over the course of four years.

It’s the start of another book of Tom Jones, meaning once again, Fielding takes a break from the narrative to expound on a certain idea. In this chapter, Fielding discusses the need for a certain level in expertise in the subjects one writes about to write effectively. The greatest problem he sees in the writing of his contemporaries, is that nobody knows how to write the genteel class, since no writers are of that class.

 

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

7.10.15

 

 

The Messages, Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

Read by Xe Sands

If track doesn’t play, please visit this link. 

Xe writes…

Hmm…I seem to be on a war poetry kick at present. For some reason, the timeless themes of incomprehensible and reprehensible loss specific to war has been resonating with me lately, even while my news consumption has been shamefully lacking. But there is something there that calls, something that only poetry and visual depiction seem to be able to get at, at least for me. It’s haunting, and visceral, and tragic.

 

 

 

Behind the Veil, by Wayne Gatfield

Read by Wayne Gatfield

If player does not display, click here.

Wayne writes…
Poetry of mine with music (not mine)

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

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